Cypripedium yatabeanum in a hot climate


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Abgeschickt von Thomas Velardi am 01 Oktober, 2005 um 04:52:51

Well something nearly miraculous has happened: my C. yatabeanum has not only survived this summerís heat, but has actually increased in size and health. This may seem a small feat, but you have to consider that Iím growing these plants in a climate that has temperatures that approximate Atlanta, Georgia. To wit, daily air temperatures reach 30įC or higher from June to September, and rarely fall below 24įC. Add to that soil temperatures that commonly exceed 25įC on a daily basis, and itís incredible that this northern ranging species could live let alone do well.

The plant grew two small healthy growths this season that persisted until the first week of September. I removed it from its pot this morning and hereís what I found:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v164/tvelardi/Cyatabeanum2005.jpg

As you can see the root system is quiet healthy. Furthermore it has grown an additional bud for next year:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v164/tvelardi/CyatabeanumBuds2005.jpg

How did I do it? I followed the advice on Mr. Tomoyuki Mogamiís website (http://www.minax-bio.co.jp/top.html) on growing Cyps in a warm climate. This page is only in Japanese, and if you translate it using Google you get a really strange result. Mostly I followed the pictures and had a friend translate important parts. In short, the plant was grown in a 1:3 mix of pumice : shredded conifer bark. Water conducting tape that extends from just below the crown of the plant to a water reservoir at the base of the pot kept the compost evenly moist. Fertilizer was given every three weeks from May to middle July. Also, during the hottest weather ice packs were applied daily to the base of the plant.

I canít say Iím an expert on this method, but clearly it works well in this climate. Iíve had mixed success with other species and hybrids using this method including Cyp. formosanum, Cyp. ventricosum, and Cyp. 'Ulla Silkens'. All plants are stored in a refrigerator for adequate winter chill except Cyp. formosanum.

Tom Velardi


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